Artist Top Fives

Slam’s Top 5 Dub Albums

Slam’s Top 5 Dub Albums
Slam’s Top 5 Dub Albums
Misty In Roots – ‘Wise and Foolish’
Misty In Roots – ‘Wise and Foolish’
Black Uhuru – ‘Sinsemillia’
Black Uhuru – ‘Sinsemillia’
King Tubby Meets Roots Radics – ‘Dangerous Dub’
King Tubby Meets Roots Radics – ‘Dangerous Dub’
Lee Perry – ‘Black Ark in Dub’
Lee Perry – ‘Black Ark in Dub’
The Clash – ‘Sandinista!’
The Clash – ‘Sandinista!’

Following their appearance on the recent Glasgow edition of Colleen’s BBC Radio 6 series, ‘Sounds of a City’, we asked Slam’s Stuart McMillan and Orde Meikle for their top five Dub albums. Check out their answers below!

Misty in Roots – ‘Wise and Foolish’

Went to see Misty in Roots play live at a student union in Glasgow on this album tour  – we were totally blown away by their live set – triple drummers and about 14 of them on stage. The title track is still one of our favourite reggae tracks ever.

Black Uhuru – ‘Sinsemilla’

We loved this third album from the awesome Black Uhuru and became huge disciples of Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare and everything they did – another stunning live band. Got introduced to this album through UB40’s driver, Nick, when he was working with another fantastic Birmingham band called Electribe 101.

King Tubby meets Roots Radics – ‘Dangerous dub’

Could have chosen any one of King Tubby’s albums as they are all amazing – He is, without a doubt, one of the grandmasters of dub genre. This album is more stripped and more radical than most as the title suggests.

Lee Perry – ‘Black Ark in Dub’

Again Lee perry is a dub architect to the highest degree, this album dropped in 1977 and was part of the Dub soundtrack at punk gigs and beyond – It was John Peel who introduced us to this music and a whole host of other esoteric oddities. The bass element has stayed with us and remained a staple in our productions even now.

The Clash – ‘Sandinista!’

Ok it’s not strictly a dub album per say – but one which very much encapsulated it’s ethos at least. A four sided antidote to the 3-minute thrash of their earlier recordings this was the Clash at their experimental best. Punk bands were not supposed to make 4 sided concept albums, and for the most, this situation would probably not have ended well.But the Clash had a certain street style and lots of it – and as a unit of Strummer, Simenon, Jones and Headen this was a chemical formula that was absolute. Take away even one component and the results would have been so different.

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