Blogs

Bob Dylan ‘Blood on the Tracks’ presented by Colleen ‘Cosmo’ Murphy

Widely considered to be one of his strongest albums, ‘Blood on the Tracks’ is often referred to as his “divorce” album although Dylan strongly contends this sentiment.

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Air “Moon Safari” presented by Ron Like Hell and Colleen

Our CAS NYC resident musicologist Ron Like Hell and CAS founder Colleen ‘Cosmo’ Murphy give the 4-1-1 on AIR’s debut album.

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Primal Scream “Screamadelica” presented by Colleen “Cosmo” Murphy

Colleen “Cosmo” Murphy talks us through one of the most iconic albums to combine the rave and indie scenes and her experience with “those accents”.

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Colleen “Cosmo” Murphy Interview

Jason Kennedy interviews Colleen “Cosmo” Murphy about Classic Album Sundays

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Listening in a Crowd

I am reading a great book by Alex Ross entitled “The Rest is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century” and came across a passage that applies to what we are doing at Classic Album Sundays. Ross explains how listening to

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Future Classic Albums: The Best of 2011

I strongly feel that classic albums are not exclusively the product of past generations. It saddens me when I hear people complaining about the state of music today as if there is lack of amazing artists and music being created at this very moment.

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Tweeters

A weekly or monthly round-up of some of the interesting articles and album info:

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Neil Young’s Thoughts on Compact Discs

“‘Everything recorded between 1981 and say, 2010 will be known as the dark ages of recorded sound,’ said Young, who had many reasons for disliking the CD.

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Tim Rushent on Martin Rushent

“Music is the closest thing we have to real magic. Sometimes it comes easy … sometimes it takes a little bit more time and a lot more patience. Both these albums were a labour of love for Dad.”

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Classic Album Sundays Sets the Record

Have we sacrificed sound quality with digital formats and is that why vinyl is having such a renaissance? Do some albums deserve to be heard beginning to end? Are most of our listening experiences confined to isolated instances such as listening on headphones to our iPods?

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